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National Transportation Data Challenge

National Transportation Data Challenge Kicks Off on May 2-3!

The Big Data Regional Innovations Hubs have announced the Transportation Data Challenge, a series of community problem solving-sessions, data faires, hackathons, and demonstrations, held in collaboration with the U.S Department of Transportation, Amazon Web Services, Microsoft, Data Science Inc., and others.

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The Machine Learning: Farm-To-Table Workshop

The Midwest Big Data Hub (MBDH) is partnering with the International Food Security at Illinois (IFSI) group at UIUC to bring together domain scientists from the Agriculture, Bioinformatics, Food-Energy-Water, and Food Security communities, along with computational experts. The objective of this workshop is to stimulate new data-driven R+D activity at the intersections of these communities. The meeting will be structured to enable new cross-community interactions and initiate grant proposals or publications.

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MBDH Spoke Awardee Guides Open Source Computational Research Infrastructure for Science

The newly released open source Computational Research Infrastructure for Science (CRIS) was developed with contributions from a Midwest Big Data Hub (MBDH) Planning Grant, “Cyberinfrastructure to Enhance Data Quality and Support Reproducible Results in Sensors.” CRIS provides an easy to use, scalable, and collaborative scientific data management and workflow cyberinfrastructure.

CRIS was developed at Purdue University under the technical leadership of Peter Baker and the scientific supervision of Professor Elisa Bertino. Dr. Bertino is the PI of the MBDH Planning grant, which contributed by assessing the quality tools and versioning techniques provided by CRIS. Within the grant, the developers are currently working on provenance models and techniques, and provenance interoperability for the CRIS provenance model.

More information can be found here.

Midwest Big Data Hackathon, University of Iowa

October 8–9, 2016
Iowa City, Iowa

The Midwest Big Data Hackathon is a 2-day, non-stop hackathon with 150 participants, and it will be held at University of Iowa—in the heart of downtown Iowa City, USA. The event is open to all university students that have a passion for creating things with technology!

Students will form teams to work on their project (or ‘hack’) up to 4 members. Projects are open format, which means that you can hack on web, mobile, desktop, or hardware applications. Company mentors will be available throughout the event for questions to make sure beginners and experts alike will have the help they need to successfully develop their project. All teams will demo their hacks at the end of the event and winners will be chosen by company mentors.

NSF awards connect Midwest Big Data Hub and scientists to solve regional challenges

Today, the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced $10 million in “Big Data Spokes” awards to initiate research in specific areas identified, supported, and organized by the Big Data Regional Innovation Hubs (BD Hubs). $2.4 million in Big Data Spoke, Early­ Concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER) and planning awards will connect the Midwest Big Data Hub (MBDH) and midwestern data scientists, to support digital agriculture; community-driven and sustainable neuroscience data infrastructure; improved sensor technologies; citizen scientists and real-time air quality monitoring; and new data-to-decision systems in hazards management by partnering data scientists with emergency personnel.

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Data Quality in a Big Data Era

September 28-29, 2016
Cyberinfrastructure Building, Wrubel Lobby, Indiana University
Bloomington, Indiana

What is data quality and what does it mean in the age of big data? Throughout the history of modern scholarship, the exchange of scholarly data was undertaken through personal interactions among scholars or through highly curated data archives, such as ICPSR (Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research). In both cases, implicit or explicit provenance mechanisms gave a relatively high degree of insurance of the quality of the data. However, the ubiquity of the web and mobile digital culture has produced disruptive new forms of data such as those based on citizen science, social network transactions, or massively deployed automatic sensors. Integrity and trustworthiness of these data are uncertain due to issues such as sampling characteristics, expertise of the data producers, or quality of the instruments. As these data are shared, fused, homogenized, and mixed, we need to ask ourselves what we know about the data and what we can trust. Failure to answer these questions endangers the integrity of the science produced from these data.

For more information, go to http://d2i.indiana.edu/mbdh.

Registration

There is no cost to attend but space is limited to 50 attendees. Registration will be available from August 5, 2016 until September 19, 2016. Early career scientists and researchers will be selected to predominantly fill available seats.

Travel Support

Travel support—automobile and lodging—for non-IU participants who are working in industry, government, or non-profit sectors is available. Qualified individuals are expected to present their work in a poster session Sept. 28, 2016 to showcase the breadth of developments occurring in Big Data. To be considered, please register by September 9, 2016 and apply for travel support. Application details are available at http://d2i.indiana.edu/mbdh/#scholarships.

Questions about the data quality workshop should be sent to Jill Minor, jsminor@indiana.edu.

Food and Data Workshop: Interoperability through the Food Pipeline

September 12-13, 2016
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The increasing ability to capture data at the level of individual agricultural fields, individual culinary recipes, and individual food waste digesters is allowing analytics-based optimization within the distinct industries responsible for producing, transporting, trading, storing, processing, packaging, wholesaling, retailing, consuming, and disposing of food. Yet addressing the pressing national/global challenges in food security due to climate change, as well as public health challenges such as obesity and malnutrition, requires optimization across the food pipeline. The Food and Data Workshop: Interoperability through the Food Pipeline, September 12-13 in the CSL Auditorium (B02), is concerned with understanding the relationship between data and food writ large, with a particular focus on questions of interoperable data ontologies, privacy, and analytic insights.

For more information and to register go to https://publish.illinois.edu/food-and-data-workshop/.